OPTIMIZATION OF CULTURE MEDIUM AND AN ANTIOXIDANT ASSAY OF BIOMASS OBTAINED FROM ALGAL SPECIES– Haematococcus lacustris

Main Article Content

M. AKASSH
VIVEK GAHANAN
HAMSALAKSHMI .
SURESH JOGHEE
V. SIVASUBRAMANIAN

Abstract

In the present study, the various effects like aeration rates, vitamins, and nitrogen sources are examined with the growth of Haematococcus lacustris (H. lacustris) in a condition where the cells are subjected to 24 hrs lighting with continuous aeration. There are various physical and chemical parameters which control the growth rate of H. lacustris. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the effect of culture media and light intensities on the growth of H. lacustris in batch culture. There are two main stages of growth involved, mainly the green stage and red stage. In the green stage the cells are divided and forms the maximum cell concentration of 404x104 ml-1, which corresponds to the growth rate of 33x 104 with a light intensity of 2500 -5000 lux. the culture solution was subjected to 24x7 lighting along with the aeration.

With the studies done on the antioxidant activity by DPPH method for the biomass of Haematococcus lacustris, linear scavenging activity of up to 29% was observed. Hence this species shows significant antioxidant activity when compared to anti-oxidant obtained from other natural and synthetic sources. An extensive study can be done on animals to prove the activity against various free radicle causing diseases with valid data.

Keywords:
Haematococcus lacustris, anti-oxidant, nutraceutical, DPPH assay, Rubic medium.

Article Details

How to Cite
AKASSH, M., GAHANAN, V., ., H., JOGHEE, S., & SIVASUBRAMANIAN, V. (2020). OPTIMIZATION OF CULTURE MEDIUM AND AN ANTIOXIDANT ASSAY OF BIOMASS OBTAINED FROM ALGAL SPECIES– Haematococcus lacustris. PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 20(23-24), 1210-1214. Retrieved from https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/4855
Section
Short Communication

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