DIFFERENCE IN FIRST SEMESTER GPA AS A FUNCTION OF DUAL CREDIT ENROLLMENT BY ETHNICITY

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BRYN BEHNKE
JOHN R. SLATE
ROBERT D. YOUNG JR

Abstract

In this research study, first semester GPAs were analyzed as a function of dual credit enrollment for a community college district in an urbanized area of southeast Texas.  Dual credit enrollment and student GPAs were analyzed separately for Asian, White, Hispanic, and Black students.  Inferential statistical analyses revealed that, with the exception of Asian students, White, Hispanic, and Black students who had been enrolled in dual credit courses had statistically significantly higher first semester GPAs compared to their ethnic/racial counterparts who had not been enrolled in dual credit courses.  Hispanic students who participated in dual credit statistically had a first semester GPA that was 0.52 points higher than Hispanic students who had not participated in dual credit, a moderate effect size.  Results of findings and implications for future research are provided.

Keywords:
Dual credit, first semester GPA, community college, ethnicity/race, Texas

Article Details

How to Cite
BEHNKE, B., SLATE, J., & JR, R. D. (2019). DIFFERENCE IN FIRST SEMESTER GPA AS A FUNCTION OF DUAL CREDIT ENROLLMENT BY ETHNICITY. Journal of Basic and Applied Research International, 25(1), 31-37. Retrieved from https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JOBARI/article/view/4504
Section
Original Research Article