RESTORATION POTENTIALS OF METHANOL AND ETHYL ACETATE FRACTIONS OF Peristophe bicalyculata ON STREPTOZOTOCIN -INDUCED DIABETIC RATS.

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JOE ENOBONG ESSIET
ETENG OFEM EFFIOM
IWARA ARIKPO IWARA
JOEL AGHO, EGHOSA
FRIDAY EFFIONG UBOH
PARTRICK EKONG EBONG

Abstract

The fascinating potentials of some medicinal plants in the management of disease and other related complications cannot be over emphasized. Thus, this study investigated the restoration potentials of the ethyl acetate and methanol fractions of P. bicalyculata leaf extract on experimental rat models. A total of thirty five (35) albino Wistar rats were used for the study. They were randomly divided into 7 groups of 5 rats each. Group 1, the standard control, received 250mg/kg body weight (b.wt) of the anti-diabetic drug, Metformin, group 2 and 3 received 200 and 400mg/kg b.wt of the methanol fraction of P. bicalyculata, (group 4 and 5 received 200 and 400 mg/kg b.wt of the ethyl acetate fraction of P. bicalyculata while groups6 and 7 were diabetic and normal control, respectively. There was a significant decrease (p <0.05) in the serum levels of total cholesterol, TG, LDL, VLDL, and increased level of HDL cholesterol in (STZ) induced diabetic treated groups. The studies showed that there was a significant reduction in the fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels of the STZ induced diabetic rats upon treatments with both fractions at 200 mg/kg and 400mg/kg b.wt. Also, the glycated haemoglobin and estimated average glucose concentrations showed a significant decrease (p <0.05) in the low and high doses of P. bicalyculata extract-treated groups compared to the DC. There was no significant (p>0.01) differences in the sex hormones (testosterone, LH and FSH).

Conclusion: The results obtained in the present study provide the scientific rationale of the anti-diabetic potentials of the plant extract on the management of diabetics.

Keywords:
Peristrophe bicalyculata, streptozotocin, cholesterol, follicle stimulating hormones, luteinizing hormone.

Article Details

How to Cite
ESSIET, J. E., EFFIOM, E. O., IWARA, I. A., EGHOSA, J. A., UBOH, F. E., & EBONG, P. E. (2021). RESTORATION POTENTIALS OF METHANOL AND ETHYL ACETATE FRACTIONS OF Peristophe bicalyculata ON STREPTOZOTOCIN -INDUCED DIABETIC RATS. Journal of International Research in Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 16(3), 11-21. Retrieved from https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JIRMEPS/article/view/6750
Section
Original Research Article

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