PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL IN RELATION TO SPECIES COMPOSITION AND DIVERSITY OF SUBTROPICAL AND TEMPERATE FOREST STANDS IN THE WESTERN HIMALAYA

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VINOD C. JOSHI
DEEPA BISHT
R. C. SUNDRIYAL
NAVEEN CHANDRA
DHANI ARYA

Abstract

The present communication aims to envisage the physico-chemical properties of soils in relation to the vegetational parameter in the subtropical and temperate forest stands of Western Himalaya. A total of four forest stands were investigated for various vegetational and physico-chemical properties ranging from 300-2250 m m.s.l. The study revealed that the soil moisture, water holding capacity (WHC) and total nitrogen recorded maximum (26.33%, 63.52%, and 0.41% respectively) in the mixed oak forest stands and minimum (19.09%, 46.28%, and 0.14% respectively) in the sal forest stands, however, the soil organic carbon (SOC) was reported maximum (4.25%) in banj-oak forest and minimum (1.23%) in sal forest stands. Temperate oak forests are richer in terms of specie richness, diversity as well as physical and chemical properties of soil as compare to subtropical sal and chir-pine forest stands. This result indicate that the soil nutrient dynamics is positively correlated with species diversity and richness of forest.

Keywords:
Oak and pine forest, organic carbon, soil nutrient, tree density

Article Details

How to Cite
JOSHI, V. C., BISHT, D., SUNDRIYAL, R. C., CHANDRA, N., & ARYA, D. (2021). PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL IN RELATION TO SPECIES COMPOSITION AND DIVERSITY OF SUBTROPICAL AND TEMPERATE FOREST STANDS IN THE WESTERN HIMALAYA. Asian Journal of Plant and Soil Sciences, 6(2), 37-45. Retrieved from https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/AJOPSS/article/view/6972
Section
Original Research Article

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