ANOMALOUS FEATURES OF BLACK CARBON AND PARTICULATE MATTER OBSERVED OVER RURAL STATION DURING OSUN OSOGBO (NIGERIA) FESTIVAL 2015

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B. O. ODESANYA
L. O. OYEDIRAN

Abstract

It has been observed that mortality and morbidity rate increases mainly during Osun-Osogbo period because of RSPM (respirable suspended particulate material). Several researchers in Nigeria and elsewhere studied vividly the impact of particles matter and toxic gases released during celebrations like Osun-Osogbo, etc. On short-term environmental air quality degradation, negative effects on human health, and also on long climatic change.


This paper mainly focuses on approaches followed for capturing mass concentration of various particles matter mainly black carbon aerosols in particular, some of the most sensitive and representative of the negative influence of fireworks on environmental air quality, dispersion and transport phenomena, possible health influence, and combat processes. The observed results over a typical rural station have been attested with in situ satellite measurements and specified to the local meteorological and surrounding anthropogenic activities that arises due to the Osun-Osogbo celebration.


Considering the influence of different pollutants at different injurious levels on human health scientist need to be developed that help setting up of safe respiratory levels for human health. Remedy measures by discouraging the burning of fireworks on the occasions of celebrations are suggested. These methods may be considered for the benefit of human health and safety of our Planet Earth, giving us healthy environment.

Keywords:
Black carbon, particulate matter, aerosols and toxic gases

Article Details

How to Cite
ODESANYA, B. O., & OYEDIRAN, L. O. (2019). ANOMALOUS FEATURES OF BLACK CARBON AND PARTICULATE MATTER OBSERVED OVER RURAL STATION DURING OSUN OSOGBO (NIGERIA) FESTIVAL 2015. Journal of Global Ecology and Environment, 9(1), 1-7. Retrieved from http://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JOGEE/article/view/4548
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Original Research Article