PATTERNS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR FAMILY REARING AMONG WOMEN IN NIGERIA: THE CASE OF CALABAR METROPOLIS

Main Article Content

STELLA B. ESUABANA

Abstract

This study examined the pattern of domestic violence and its implication for family rearing among women in Nigeria. This study was based in Calabar metropolis. The study adopted four research questions. The sample population for this study comprised of 350 women in the study area. The instrument for data collection was a questionnaire titled" Pattern of Domestic Violence and Implication for Family Rearing (PDVIFR). The instrument consisted of two sections. The section comprises of demographic variables while section B consisted of 26 items. The instrument was validated by experts. Simple percentage was used as a statistical tool to analyses the research questions. Results showed verbal, physical, sexual and emotional violence at prevalence rates of 38.0%, 26.5%, 10.7% and 1.4%, respectively. A total of 14.0% had experienced a combination of physical and verbal abuse while 7.0% had experienced a combination of physical and sexual violence. Full-time housewives and self-employed women were most abused, of which 82.7% had no definite timing pattern. The domestic violence pattern is varied: the commonest forms are verbal, physical, sexual and emotional, and in some cases a combination of some or all of these forms. It was therefore recommended that wives should be rather employed to reduce domestic violence at home.

Keywords:
Domestic, violence, patterns, family, women, Nigeria, Calabar, guidance, counselling

Article Details

How to Cite
ESUABANA, S. (2019). PATTERNS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR FAMILY REARING AMONG WOMEN IN NIGERIA: THE CASE OF CALABAR METROPOLIS. Asian Journal of Arts, Humanities and Social Studies, 2(2), 37–41. Retrieved from http://www.ikprress.org/index.php/AJAHSS/article/view/4740
Section
Original Research Article

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